Keeping car show enthusiasts informed

Keeping car show enthusiasts informed

Keeping car show enthusiasts informed

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Pebble Beach is not a "Concourse - day - elegance"

So difficult is it for Americans to correctly pronounce the French phrase “concours d’elegance” that many in the know have given up correcting the misguided.

I’ve assembled some clips from YouTube that clearly demonstrate both correct flowing pronunciations and a variety of bungled ones. Lest any prominent car owners or others in the collector car realm be worried about being outed, the examples included here are limited to individuals considered fair game: television newscasters.

“way cool”

Bob Stevens, at WHHI in South Carolina and veteran sportscaster, confidently gets it right.

also correct

bad

 
 
 

There are hundreds of audio examples on YouTube and other sites. Fortunately those folks wont be called out. Television newscasters, on the other hand, are fair game. The are considered public figures and thus fair game for parody. So I’ve asssembled some video clips to illustrate the the good an bad

I’ve only icnluded the videos in this post 

that 

By following two simple rules, 

Once you understand the two 

While some French there are slight variations in what’s deemed proper in the US, there

is the  slight nuances in the proper pronounciat

The French have wowed us with remarkably stylish cars vintage cars by Bugatti, Delahaye and others, so the least we can do is correctly pronounce their term – “concours d’elegance” – that we’ve come to know as an exclusive car show.

The moniker translates literally as “competition of elegance, but has evolved to define a critically judged gathering of outstanding motor vehicles.

The phrase,  is so often bungled that people

Normally when a 

Not only do people bungle the entire phrase, which ” they also screw up the truncated version, which in theory should

For the New Year, let’s resolve to eradicate the use of the word “concourse” when referring to a “concours d’elegance” – the French phrase used to describe an exclusive car show.

Concourse – rhyming with horse – most often refers to a long open space at an airport or rail station.

we’ve come to term an elegant car show. It’s just plain wrong.

 
 
 

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The French have graced us with remarkably stylish cars vintage cars by Bugatti, Delahaye and others, so the least we can do is correctly pronounce their term – “concours d’elegance” – that we’ve come to know as a high-end car show.

Concourse – rhyming with horse – most often refers to a long open space at an airport or rail station.

Rule #1: The “s” in concours is silent

 

Nor does the ending have a “z” sound like the beer Coors.

The phrase, which literally translates as “competition of elegance,” is so often bungled

incorporated in the title or description of upwards of a hundred car shows in the US and Canada.

The phrase has not been Americanized like the bakery items: eclair and croissant.

A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation.

It would be a faux pas to bodge the panache of the phrase.

we’ve come to interpret as “fancy car show.”

For the New Year, let’s resolve to eradicate the use of the word “concourse” when referring to an elegant car show. It’s just plain wrong.

In the car world, the French phrase “concours d’elegance” translates as

 
 
 

xx

For several years, I’ve been accumulating  many cringe .  video clips of newscasters

Many people within the car community have are challenged with the pronounciation Hopefully this post will make the rounds and help develop consistency within the car community so that others will follow suit.

There are hundreds of audio examples on YouTube and other sites. Fortunately those folks wont be called out. Television newscasters, on the other hand, are fair game. The are considered public figures and thus fair game for parody. So I’e asssembled some video clips to illustrate the the good an bad.

Mention Alliance Francaise

 
Rule #1: The “s” in concours is silent

 

Concourse — rhyming with horse — most often refers to a long open space at an airport or rail station. Nor does the ending have a “z” sound like the beer Coors.

The following pronunciations of “concours” are considered appropriate:

Kon-koor
Kawn-koor
Kong-koor
Con-core
Con-kor

Rule #2:  d’elegance contains 3 syllables

Rule #2a:  d’ is not a syllable

Delaware

plural

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coupe or coupay like gents from Top Gear

Mark Lizewskie

Mark Lieshewke

 Because the elegance begins with a vowel, the term “de” — meaning “of” — is contracted to become part of the next word, thus day-lay the combination sounds like “della-gonse.”  There is no “duh” or “dee” in the pronunciation.

, then “kon-KOOR della-GONSE” should flow off your tongue. Note that when used in this phrase, the second syllable of concours is emphasized, but when the expression is shortened to a single word, the emphasis moves to the first syllable.

“kon-KOOR della-GONSE”

and

“KON-koor”